Full-Time/Part-Time Employment Based on National Definitions (2018 Edition)
< < >-< UKDS.Stat
Open all groups and itemsClose all groups and itemsSend link via emailPrintOpen in stand-alone windowClose this window
Click to expand Database Specific
Click to collapse Database Specific
Click to expand Abstract
Click to collapse Abstract

This dataset contains annual labour market statistics on full-time and part-time employment based on national definition. Data are broken down by professional status - employees, total employment - sex and standardised age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55+, total). Data are expressed in thousands of persons.

Click to expand Source
Click to collapse Source
Click to expand Contact person/organisation
Click to collapse Contact person/organisation
Click to expand Direct source
Click to collapse Direct source

Bibliographic citation:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: Labour Market Statistics: Full-Time/Part-Time Employment Based on National Definitions, OECD Employment and Labour Market Statistics. UK Data Service. http://dx.doi.org/10.5257/oecd/labour/2018-10

Click to expand Source Periodicity
Click to collapse Source Periodicity

Yearly

Click to expand Data Characteristics
Click to collapse Data Characteristics
Click to expand Link to Release calendar
Click to collapse Link to Release calendar

Annually

Click to expand Other data characteristics
Click to collapse Other data characteristics

Other factors as well affect the international comparability of the estimates. In some countries, the hours’ cut-off is based on hours for the main job, in others on total hours for all jobs. Certain countries do not consider unpaid family workers to be employed unless they work more than a minimum number of hours, so that such workers do not enter into counts for part-time workers. The following describes the sources and definitions used for OECD countries as well as the adjustments made by the Secretariat to ensure historical comparability.

Click to expand Periodicity
Click to collapse Periodicity

Annual

Click to expand Reference period
Click to collapse Reference period

1966-2017

Click to expand Unit of measure used
Click to collapse Unit of measure used

Data are expressed in thousands of persons.

Click to expand Variables collected
Click to collapse Variables collected

The definition of part-time work varies considerably across OECD countries Essentially three main approaches can be distinguished: i) a classification based on the worker’s perception of his/her employment situation; ii) a cut-off (generally 30 or 35 hours per week) based on usual working hours, with persons usually working fewer hours being considered part-timers; iii) a comparable cut-off based on actual hours worked during the reference week. A criterion based on actual hours will generally yield a part-time rate higher than one based on usual hours, particularly if there are temporary reductions in working time as a result of holidays, illness, short-timing, etc. On the other hand, it is not entirely clear whether a classification based on the worker’s perception will necessarily yield estimates of part-time work that are higher or lower than one based on a fixed cut-off. In one country (France) which changed from 1981 to 1982 from a definition based on an actual hours cut-off (30 hours) to one based on the respondent’s perception, the latter criterion appeared to produce slightly higher estimates.

Click to expand Population & Scope
Click to collapse Population & Scope
Click to expand Geographic coverage
Click to collapse Geographic coverage
Click to expand Statistical population
Click to collapse Statistical population

This table contains data on full-time and part-time employment based on national definition. Data are broken down by professional status - employees, total employment - sex and standardised age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55+, total).

Click to expand Concepts & Classifications
Click to collapse Concepts & Classifications
Click to expand Other Aspects
Click to collapse Other Aspects
Full-Time/Part-Time Employment Based on National Definitions (2018 Edition)Abstract

This dataset contains annual labour market statistics on full-time and part-time employment based on national definition. Data are broken down by professional status - employees, total employment - sex and standardised age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55+, total). Data are expressed in thousands of persons.

Contact person/organisation

http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/help/get-in-touch.aspxhttp://ukdataservice.ac.uk/help/get-in-touch.aspxDirect source

Bibliographic citation:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: Labour Market Statistics: Full-Time/Part-Time Employment Based on National Definitions, OECD Employment and Labour Market Statistics. UK Data Service. http://dx.doi.org/10.5257/oecd/labour/2018-10

See articles on Google Scholar citing this datasethttps://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?q=10.5257%2Foecd%2Flabour&btnG=&hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C5
Source Periodicity

Yearly

Unit of measure used

Data are expressed in thousands of persons.

Variables collected

The definition of part-time work varies considerably across OECD countries Essentially three main approaches can be distinguished: i) a classification based on the worker’s perception of his/her employment situation; ii) a cut-off (generally 30 or 35 hours per week) based on usual working hours, with persons usually working fewer hours being considered part-timers; iii) a comparable cut-off based on actual hours worked during the reference week. A criterion based on actual hours will generally yield a part-time rate higher than one based on usual hours, particularly if there are temporary reductions in working time as a result of holidays, illness, short-timing, etc. On the other hand, it is not entirely clear whether a classification based on the worker’s perception will necessarily yield estimates of part-time work that are higher or lower than one based on a fixed cut-off. In one country (France) which changed from 1981 to 1982 from a definition based on an actual hours cut-off (30 hours) to one based on the respondent’s perception, the latter criterion appeared to produce slightly higher estimates.

Periodicity

Annual

Reference period

1966-2017

Link to Release calendar

Annually

Other data characteristics

Other factors as well affect the international comparability of the estimates. In some countries, the hours’ cut-off is based on hours for the main job, in others on total hours for all jobs. Certain countries do not consider unpaid family workers to be employed unless they work more than a minimum number of hours, so that such workers do not enter into counts for part-time workers. The following describes the sources and definitions used for OECD countries as well as the adjustments made by the Secretariat to ensure historical comparability.

Statistical population

This table contains data on full-time and part-time employment based on national definition. Data are broken down by professional status - employees, total employment - sex and standardised age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55+, total).

Geographic coverage

Cross-national; National
OECD countries

http://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/list-oecd-member-countries.htmhttp://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/list-oecd-member-countries.htm
Key statistical concept

For detailed information on labour force surveys for all countries please see the following file:

LFS Notes Sources/metadata/OECD/ELM/LFSNOTES_SOURCES.pdf
Recommended uses and limitations

UK Data Service Guide to OECD Employment and Labour Market Statistics

OECD Employment and Labour Market Statisticshttp://ukdataservice.ac.uk/use-data/guides/dataset/labour-statistics.aspx
Other comments

Copyright Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

The OECD has specified that registration is not required. Effective July 15th 2015, the UK Data Service made access to OECD online statistics databases free to all users via UKDS.Stat.

Please refer to the OECD Terms and Conditionshttp://www.oecd.org/termsandconditions/