Average Annual Hours Actually Worked per Worker
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This dataset contains annual labour market statistics based on the total number of hours worked over the year divided by the average number of people in employment. The data are intended for comparisons of trends over time; they are unsuitable for comparisons of the level of average annual hours of work for a given year, because of differences in their sources. Part-time workers are covered as well as full-time. Data are expressed in number of hours worked per year per person in employment. Data are expressed in number of hours worked per year per person in employment and are presented from 1950 onwards.

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Bibliographic citation:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: Hours Worked: Average Annual Hours Actually Worked, OECD Employment and Labour Market Statistics. UK Data Service. https://doi.org/10.5257/oecd/labour/2018-10

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Yearly

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Annual

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Start: 1950
End: 2017

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Hours

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The concept used is the total number of hours worked over the year divided by the average number of people in employment. The data are intended for comparisons of trends over time; they are unsuitable for comparisons of the level of average annual hours of work for a given year, because of differences in their sources. Part-time workers are covered as well as full-time workers.

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The series on annual hours actually worked per person in total employment presented in this table for all 35 OECD countries are consistent with the series retained for the calculation of productivity measures in the OECD Productivity database. However, there may be some differences for some countries given that the main purpose of the latter database is to report data series on labour input (i.e. total hours worked) and also because the updating of databases occur at different moments of the year.

Hours actually worked per person in employment are according to National Accounts concepts for 25 countries: Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Korea, Latvia, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey. Secretariat estimates for Lithuania for annual hours worked are based on the European Labour Force Survey as are estimates for dependent employees for Austria, Estonia, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Portugal and the Slovak Republic. For the remaining countries, the sources and methodologies are the same as those presented in the previous edition of the OECD Employment Outlook, as are estimates reported for dependent employment for 29 OECD countries. The table also includes labour force survey based estimates for Costa Rica and the Russian Federation.

The following change has been implemented in January 2019: For Austria, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Sweden and the United Kingdom, average actual hours worked data calculated in country's national accounts are replaced with estimates produced at the OECD using the OECD simplified component method, which relies on the EU-LFS and complementary sources. This reflects conclusions from the OECD Statistics Working Paper International Productivity Gaps: Are Labour Input Measures Comparable? which shows that the use of a direct method for the estimation of average hours worked creates systematic upwards bias, weighing down on productivity levels - please refer to the paper itself for a more detailed account. It is important to stress that the use of the simplified component method by the OECD for this group of countries is intended to be only a stop-gap until such a time that these countries will be able to align their estimates with the national accounts framework and correct for self-reporting bias, with many countries already moving in this direction.

While the paper clearly highlights the current bias in international comparisons of productivity levels, it does not follow that the same holds for international comparisons of productivity growth rates. The time series takes average hours actually worked levels using the simplified component method in 2016 as a benchmark, and projects this series forwards and backwards using official (national) productivity growth rates . In this way, by definition, labour productivity growth rates are not affected and, as such, there is no difference between national and OECD growth rate series.

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Average Annual Hours Actually Worked per WorkerAbstract

This dataset contains annual labour market statistics based on the total number of hours worked over the year divided by the average number of people in employment. The data are intended for comparisons of trends over time; they are unsuitable for comparisons of the level of average annual hours of work for a given year, because of differences in their sources. Part-time workers are covered as well as full-time. Data are expressed in number of hours worked per year per person in employment. Data are expressed in number of hours worked per year per person in employment and are presented from 1950 onwards.

Contact person/organisation

Get in touchhttp://ukdataservice.ac.uk/help/get-in-touch.aspxDirect source

Bibliographic citation:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: Hours Worked: Average Annual Hours Actually Worked, OECD Employment and Labour Market Statistics. UK Data Service. https://doi.org/10.5257/oecd/labour/2018-10

Source Periodicity

Yearly

Unit of measure used

Hours

Periodicity

Annual

Reference period

Start: 1950
End: 2017

Statistical population

The concept used is the total number of hours worked over the year divided by the average number of people in employment. The data are intended for comparisons of trends over time; they are unsuitable for comparisons of the level of average annual hours of work for a given year, because of differences in their sources. Part-time workers are covered as well as full-time workers.

Geographic coverage

In order to facilitate analysis and comparisons over time, historical data for OECD members have been provided over as long a period as possible, often even before a country became a member of the Organisation. Information on the membership dates of all OECD countries can be found at OECD Ratification Dates.

OECD Ratification Dateshttp://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/list-oecd-member-countries.htm
Key statistical concept

The series on annual hours actually worked per person in total employment presented in this table for all 35 OECD countries are consistent with the series retained for the calculation of productivity measures in the OECD Productivity database. However, there may be some differences for some countries given that the main purpose of the latter database is to report data series on labour input (i.e. total hours worked) and also because the updating of databases occur at different moments of the year.

Hours actually worked per person in employment are according to National Accounts concepts for 25 countries: Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Korea, Latvia, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey. Secretariat estimates for Lithuania for annual hours worked are based on the European Labour Force Survey as are estimates for dependent employees for Austria, Estonia, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Portugal and the Slovak Republic. For the remaining countries, the sources and methodologies are the same as those presented in the previous edition of the OECD Employment Outlook, as are estimates reported for dependent employment for 29 OECD countries. The table also includes labour force survey based estimates for Costa Rica and the Russian Federation.

The following change has been implemented in January 2019: For Austria, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Sweden and the United Kingdom, average actual hours worked data calculated in country's national accounts are replaced with estimates produced at the OECD using the OECD simplified component method, which relies on the EU-LFS and complementary sources. This reflects conclusions from the OECD Statistics Working Paper International Productivity Gaps: Are Labour Input Measures Comparable? which shows that the use of a direct method for the estimation of average hours worked creates systematic upwards bias, weighing down on productivity levels - please refer to the paper itself for a more detailed account. It is important to stress that the use of the simplified component method by the OECD for this group of countries is intended to be only a stop-gap until such a time that these countries will be able to align their estimates with the national accounts framework and correct for self-reporting bias, with many countries already moving in this direction.

While the paper clearly highlights the current bias in international comparisons of productivity levels, it does not follow that the same holds for international comparisons of productivity growth rates. The time series takes average hours actually worked levels using the simplified component method in 2016 as a benchmark, and projects this series forwards and backwards using official (national) productivity growth rates . In this way, by definition, labour productivity growth rates are not affected and, as such, there is no difference between national and OECD growth rate series.

OECD Employment Outlook 2018http://www.oecd.org/els/oecd-employment-outlook-19991266.htmAnnual Hours Worked\metadata\OECD\ELM\ANNUAL_HOURS_WORKED.pdfInternational Comparability of OECD Measures of Annual Hours Workedhttp://www.oecd.org/employment/emp/International-comparability-of-OECD-measures-of-annual-hours-worked.pdf
Recommended uses and limitations

UKDS Guide to OECD Employment and Labour Market Statisticshttp://ukdataservice.ac.uk/use-data/guides/dataset/labour-statistics.aspxOther comments

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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

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